Australian Digital Forensics Conference

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publisher

RI Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia

Abstract

The ubiquitous nature of portable communication devices presents a number of opportunities for automated device discovery, tracking and possible owner identification. Consumer devices such as smartphones, tablets, wearables, laptops and vehicle entertainment systems commonly support the 802.15.1 (Bluetooth) wireless communication protocol that enables a variety device discovery and fingerprinting techniques. We provide an overview of these techniques encompassing those native to the protocol as well as those that are possibly protocol-agnostic due to their inherently generic nature. We then introduce an opportunity for a comparison study that sets out to examine and quantify the effectiveness of selected techniques in the field. To assess the potential viability of such study in the local context, we employ location-aware inquiry scanning and discuss the results of the exploratory data collection. We conclude that in this context the simplest technique being inquiry scanning can be used to establish a baseline for comparison with other techniques.

Comments

This paper was originally presented at The Proceedings of [the] 13th Australian Digital Forensics Conference, held from the 30 November – 2 December, 2015 (pp. 77-84), Edith Cowan University Joondalup Campus, Perth, Western Australia.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.4225/75/57b3f8ebfb88c