Australian Digital Forensics Conference

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publisher

School of Computer and Information Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia

Abstract

The process of validating the correct operation of software is difficult for a variety of reasons. The need to validate software utilised as forensic computing tools suffers the same fate and is hampered to a greater extent with the source code of said tools usually not being accessible. Therefore a testing regime must be developed that offers a high degree of correctness and high probability of finding software faults with limited ability to view source code. Software testing is a complex component of software engineering in its own right. This complexity is encountered with an infinite number of environments posed by hardware, and cohosted software; one can never determine an absolute range of tests to determine the software in each potential environment or custom setting. Therefore a finite set of tests are developed to validate the software. As the software being tested is not disclosed to the source code level the testing is developed around the functions of the software. Using techniques categorized in the black box methodology this regime must attempt to tender a validity status to the software’s functions.

Comments

Originally published in the Proceedings of the 4th Australian Digital Forensics Conference, Edith Cowan University, Perth Western Australia, December 4th 2006.

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