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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1990v15n2.4

Abstract

Children's classroom success has been attributed to a variety of factors (Watts, 1975). Among these factors are the quality and number of interactions occurring between the teacher and the students (Brophy and Good, 1974). Students who attract a greater proportion of the teacher's time and experience more positive interactions are more likely to be successful than other students. Additionally it has been argued (McKessar and Thomas, 1978) that some students may have greater expertise in capturing a teacher's attention, that is, by initiating interactions, while King (1979) considered that students engaged in behaviours which were designed to maintain the teacher's performance expectations of them. Earlier literature suggested. that the teacher was responsible for controlling the nature and quality of classroom interactions (Flanders, 1970) but the interactional skills identified by the above researchers suggest that a reciprocal procedural agreement exists between the teacher and some students (Zimmerman, 1987).

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1990v15n2.4