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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1992v17n2.7

Abstract

If anyone were misguided enough to offer a prize for the sector of English education most subject to government intervention, the institutions concerned with initial teacher training would win it hands down. The intervention (a less polite word would be interference) has, over time, taken three main forms: alterations to the structure and organisation of provision; attempts to match student numbers to subsequent demand; and control over curricular content. This paper is an attempt to take a relatively longterm view of relevant developments, setting the present situation in its historical context. It will thus necessarily adopt a broad-brush rather than finely detailed approach. It will also focus on the scene in England. What has happened in Wales and Northern Ireland is broadly similar but Scotland has its own independent (and to envious southern eyes more congenial) system.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1992v17n2.7