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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1994v19n1.3

Abstract

In recent years, in Australia, there has been an increasing acknowledgment that work practices need to be developed around the concept of partnership with less intrusive and coercive management regimes. All participants are recognised as agents of the productive process, albeit on different scales and at different rates. Partnership does not preclude an understanding that some will be more advanced in their skills and understandings than others, that some will be in need of greater assistance than others. What is distinctive is that involvement in development will be collaborative, rather than coercive; cooperative, rather than competitive; enabling rather than disabling, oriented to means as well as ends. The emergence of better understandings of partnership in the conduct of various enterprises in Australia has not come about by chance. In the last decade there has evolved a specific socio-political context which has made the restructuring of work relations imperative. Lepani (1992) has argued that Australia has to find a new place in a greatly changed global economic order and be poised to innovate in the knowledge that our most flexible resource is human rather than material (Boomer, 1988). It is in this context that the National Project on the Quality of Teaching and Learning (NPQTL) was formed. Three major working parties were formed: Work Organisation and related Pedagogical Issues; National Professional Issues (registration, accreditation, qualification); and, Teachers' Professional Preparation and Career Development (pre-service and in-service education),

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1994v19n1.3