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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1995v20n1.5

Abstract

Over the last decade, the term 'reflection', has reemerged as a central focus surrounding the issue of providing a practical, technical oriented teacher preparation program, as opposed to a liberal, socially oriented, type education (Richardson, 1990). Whilst there has been much support for the image of the teacher as a reflective professional (Schon, 1983), there appears to be no definitive' description as to what constitutes reflective practice, or scholarly consensus as to the ways and means by which teacher educators might encourage its development. It has been described as "difficult" (Wildman & Niles, 1987), "fuzzy" (Tom, 1987), "problematic" (Ross, 1989), "knotty" (Bullough, 1989) and a "slippery and chaotic" (Smyth, 1989) concept to pin down. Just as the concept of teaching can and indeed does mean different things to different people in different situations, so too does the concept of reflection and the image of the teacher as a reflective professional (Vaughan,1990:210).

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1995v20n1.5