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DOI

10.14221/ajte.2001v26n2.2

Abstract

One of the cornerstones of student learning is the ability to use appropriate learning strategies. Awareness and orchestration of learning strategies are central to self-regulation of learning. Effective learners have a range of strategies and use them appropriately for different tasks. Effective learners are flexible and can adapt their strategy use to achieve their learning goals. If we expect prospective teachers to help their students become effective learners, they themselves need to be aware of and manage their own learning. But are our prospective teachers themselves effective learners in terms of strategy use? Using a qualitative approach, we examined the learning strategies of undergraduate and graduate Education students from a private and a public university. At the beginning and end of semester, as an integral part of a unit of study, students were asked to report on their learning strategies related to the learning task and to themselves as learners. Results are discussed in terms of the range and diversity of reported learning strategies, and students’ self-awareness regarding their own learning. Changes over the semester are also discussed. Implications for teacher education programs, for the development of university curricula in general and for staff development are considered, with the view of improving the quality of teaching and learning.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.2001v26n2.2