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DOI

10.14221/ajte.2002v27n2.2

Abstract

The discourse of reflection is now firmly embedded in a range of teacher education programs in Australia and overseas. Reflective frameworks have been used by teacher educators to offset the perennial emphasis on technically prescriptive interpretations of ‘being a teacher’. Whilst these undoubtedly contribute to the personal ‘meaning making’ of neophyte teachers, particularly in relation to practical classroom experiences, there remains significant scope to integrate a more concerted reflective approach throughout other elements of the teacher education endeavour. When the language of reflection is applied only in a cursory or superficial way in the teacher education context the opportunity to acknowledge, nurture and challenge the developing identity of the teacher is limited. The critically important question of ‘Who am I?’ is subsumed by an emphasis on ‘What do I have to do?’ In establishing an identity as a teaching professional it is critical that teacher education students come to understand their identity as a lifelong learner and consequently, their own values, attitudes and beliefs as learners. This paper provides an exemplar of one teacher education initiative that attempts to integrate both the skills and identity agendas through a metacognitive and reflective practice approach.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.2002v27n2.2