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DOI

10.14221/ajte.2012v37n11.4

Abstract

This paper explores the implementation of a Flickr (Web 2.0 photo sharing software) learning task in a first year primary education course. The context for the task was a Multiliteracies course where students designed digital media activities for later use with primary age students. The Flickr task was constructed to determine how a learning activity might be designed to afford the best opportunities for emergent learning (Kawka, Larkin, & Danaher, 2011). Emergent learning describes learning situations where: the student is self-directed; the content is created and distributed by learners; and the learning destination is open-ended and unpredictable (Williams, Karousou, & Mackness, 2011). In discussing this emergent learning environment we also make explicit reference to Transactional Distance Theory (Moore, 1993). The paper analyses data collected in phase one of an emergent learning project (Semester Two, 2011), discusses the outcomes of the learning task and questions whether the opportunities provided for interaction and communication between students resulted in emergent learning. Initial data suggest that, although the Flickr environment affords opportunities for emergent learning, for this group of students within the confines of the particular task and learning environment, evidence of emergent learning was minimal. This has ongoing implications for the design of teacher education courses which incorporate blended learning pedagogies.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.2012v37n11.4