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DOI

10.14221/ajte.2014v39n8.9

Abstract

It is well documented that the first-year experience is crucial to student success at university. The transition to university provides many challenges for students from a personal, social and academic perspective. Over several decades, universities across Australia have implemented strategies to improve the attrition rate of first year students. This paper discusses a program designed to meet the specific needs of students in the School of Education, at a university in a metropolitan suburb of Perth, Western Australia. The Network Teach program is unique in that it is a student-run organisation. It offers social networking and academic support systems to all year levels of enrolled Education students. The research investigates factors that may affect students in their first year of university studies. The research also looks at the types of events the organisation offers, mentoring programs and the overall benefits of Network Teach. The significance of this research revolves around the support initiated by the students and the emergence of new cultural capital within the cohort. The relationships developed throughout this process provide for reinvention of new identities as university students.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.2014v39n8.9