•  
  •  
 

DOI

10.14221/ajte.1979v4n1.4

Abstract

Most research surveys in recent years have revealed that problems of language permeate every aspect of life of migrant communities. Migrants who have attained a reasonable command of English are likely to be better adjusted and therefore more easily accepted by the host society and less vulnerable to exploitation than are other members of their community; circumstances which obviously make for easier assimilation. A methodological study was set up to investigate degrees in acquiring the varying standards of knowledge of English among Lebanese migrants, attempts made to learn English after immigration, the language spoken at home, the insistence of parents that their children learn English, and several other measurements. Specifically designed questions and a brief multidimensional test were employed to assist in the overall analysis.

Share

Article Location

 
COinS

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1979v4n1.4