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DOI

10.14221/ajte.2015v40n2.9

Abstract

This article reports on my self-study of leading cohorts of Bachelor of Education student teachers through collaborative reflections applying reflective questions strategy during four weeks of residential practicum in a rural school. I explore the potential for reflective questions approach as an effective tool for reflection and professional learning in teaching and mentoring pre-service teachers. Data consisted of journal entries describing my experiences as classroom teacher and teacher educator and, of teaching and mentoring groups of students during residential practicum. Reading teacher education as text and, the audio recorded collaborative reflection conversations also provided data. Students’ documented personal and collaborative reflections were additional source materials. Data analysis employed qualitative procedures of content analysis and coding to determine themes relevant to both my and student teachers’ professional development. Engaging in this self-study based on reflective questions was essential for confronting my own assumptions and beliefs about mentoring and teaching teachers. This led to the growth of my and the students’ critical reflection and quality of professional thought and, a re-examination of my approach to mentoring and teaching students during residential practicum. Findings also indicate growth of students’ general pedagogical knowledge, confidence, independence and autonomy.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.2015v40n2.9