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DOI

10.14221/ajte.2016v41n6.10

Abstract

The national bicultural early childhood curriculum in New Zealand, Te Whāriki, and the Graduating Teacher Standards require that graduating teachers are competent in Māori language as well as English, and have an understanding of aspects of Māori knowledge. However, research shows that teachers are not yet proficient in the skills needed to deliver the bicultural curriculum effectively. This paper explores the role of teacher-education providers in equipping their graduates to deliver that curriculum. Framed by an appreciative inquiry approach, data were collected from courses displayed on the websites of ten early-childhood tertiary teacher-education providers, followed by interviews with four participants from one provider. Findings revealed that providers considered their key role was in developing student teachers’ cultural understanding and commitment. Although the paper focuses on a bicultural curriculum in Aotearoa New Zealand, the findings have implications internationally for lecturers who seek to provide student teachers with culturally inclusive programmes.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.2016v41n6.10