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DOI

10.14221/ajte.1984v9n2.1

Abstract

With the expansion of schooling in the 1950s and 1960s there was a consequent flurry of curriculum activity. More pupils stayed longer at school and schools had to cater for a wider range of abilities and interests. New curricula were developed, old curricula revised to provide educational programmes for the changing clientele, and many curriculum projects initiated, covering all aspects of schooling. By the 1970s these curriculum projects had been evaluated and the evaluations provided new insights into the whole curriculum process. One insight of particular interest concerned the role of the teacher. What the teacher did in the classroom was central to the whole curriculum process; no curriculum was teacher-proof. In particular, what were the teacher's views on, and beliefs about, teaching in general and teaching specific subjects in particular? (Howson, 1976; Fey, 1979).

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.14221/ajte.1984v9n2.1