Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publisher

Edith Cowan University, Western Australia in association with Khon Kaen University, Thailand and Bansomdejchaopraya Rajabhat University, Thailand.

Comments

Originally published in the Proceedings of the EDU-COM 2008 International Conference. Sustainability in Higher Education: Directions for Change, Edith Cowan University, Perth Western Australia, 19-21 November 2008.

Abstract

The researcher utilized a descriptive method of research, and the data was interpreted, analysed, discussed and presented by using the descriptive-analytical one. The objective was to identify the teacher styles and the teaching styles that encourage lifelong learning in an International Business Management (IBM) program comparing a native English-speaking university (Whitworth University, USA) with a non-native English-speaking one (Payap University, Thailand). The results showed that satisfactory teacher styles and teaching styles encouraged students toward lifelong learning. The styles have to be equally balanced between teacher styles: teacher-oriented method, task participation of students, and independent study, and teaching styles: based on textbook; research and information system management; and experience and practice. There was no significant difference in the attitude of the teachers and students in a native Englishspeaking university and a non-native English-speaking university regarding the satisfactory teacher styles and teaching styles compared with their expectation and experience. Teachers and students in both universities had positive attitudes toward the satisfactory teacher styles and teaching styles, and their expectation was at a higher positive attitude than their experience. Students in a native Englishspeaking university had no different expectations and experience from their teachers - Both had positive attitudes. In sight of a non-native English-speaking university, teachers and students had the same positive expectation toward the satisfactory teacher styles and teaching styles but students had a different experience from their teachers - Teachers had positive experience but students had neutral experience, with a statistical significance of 0.05 level. Furthermore, the attitude evaluations between teachers and students toward teacher styles and teaching styles indicated a small gap with an accepted-level for developing teachers and students‘ expectation and experience in lifelong learning.

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