Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publisher

Edith Cowan University, Western Australia in association with Khon Kaen University, Thailand and Bansomdejchaopraya Rajabhat University, Thailand.

Comments

Originally published in the Proceedings of the EDU-COM 2006 International Conference. Engagement and Empowerment: New Opportunities for Growth in Higher Education, Edith Cowan University, Perth Western Australia, 22-24 November 2006.

Abstract

This paper contends that if higher education is to be relevant, then the curriculum must incorporate generic, transferable lifeskills (also referred to as ‗generic graduate attributes‘) in addition to the regular subject content of their specific discipline or programme. There is a general consensus among educationists and business people alike that much of what students learn today won't be true five years from now. However, if they are taught how to take responsibility for their own ideas, how to think and communicate a problem through and how to have a positive can-do attitude, then no matter what subject matter is used to get these generic, transferable life skills across, they are being given something they can use throughout their lives. This is one of the biggest challenges facing university teachers across the globe today - teachers of tomorrow's leaders. By making use of Hopson and Scally's work on Lifeskills Teaching and William Purkey's ideas on Invitational Learning, the paper will outline ways in which this could be achieved.

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