Title

Power-time, force-time, and velocity-time curve analysis during the jump squat: impact of load

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Human Kinetics

Place of Publication

USA

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

Exercise, Biomedical and Health Science

RAS ID

5896

Comments

This article was originally published as

Cormie, P., McBride, J. M., & McCaulley, G. O. (2008). Power-time, force-time, and velocity-time curve analysis during the jump squat: impact of load.Journal of applied biomechanics, 24(2), 112.

Original article available here

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to examine the impact of load on the power-, force- and velocity-time curves during the jump squat. The analysis of these curves for the entire movement at a sampling frequency of 200-500 Hz averaged across 18 untrained male subjects is the most novel aspect of this study. Jump squat performance was assessed in a randomized fashion across five different external loads: 0, 20, 40, 60, and 80 kg (equivalent to 0 ± 0, 18 ± 4, 37 ± 8, 55 ± 12, 74 ± 15% of 1RM, respectively). The 0-kg loading condition (i.e., body mass only) was the load that maximized peak power output, displaying a significantly (p ≤ .05) greater value than the 40, 60, and 80 kg loads. The shape of the force-, power-, and velocity-time curves changed significantly as the load applied to the jump squat increased. There was a significantly greater rate of power development in the 0 kg load in comparison with all other loads examined. As the first comprehensive illustration of how the entire power-, force-, and velocity-time curves change across various loading conditions, this study provides extensive evidence that a load equaling an individuals body mass (i.e., external load = 0 kg) maximizes power output in untrained individuals during the jump squat.