Title

A Western Australian Survey on Public Attitudes Toward and Knowledge of Electroconvulsive Therapy

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

SAGE

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

Psychology and Social Science

RAS ID

5293

Comments

Originally published as: Teh, S. P., Helmes, E., & Drake, D. G. (2007). A Western Australian survey on public attitudes toward and knowledge of electroconvulsive therapy. The International journal of social psychiatry, 53(3), 247-273. Original article available here

Abstract

AIMS: Healthcare professionals have debated the use and effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for more than 65 years. Yet, knowledge about, and attitudes towards, ECT have not been thoroughly researched within the Australian community. This study focused on a Western Australian perspective on these issues. METHOD: The objectives were achieved with specifically developed questionnaires. Six hundred surveys were distributed across the metropolitan area of Perth, Australia. RESULTS: A total of 379 completed questionnaires indicated that more than 60% of respondents had some knowledge about the main aspects of ECT. Participants were generally opposed to the use of ECT on individuals with psychosocial issues, on children and on involuntary patients. Public perceptions of ECT were also found to be mainly negative. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that clinicians should ensure that individuals recommended for ECT are knowledgeable about basic ECT processes and implications in order to ensure their full informed consent.

Article Location

 
COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1177/0020764006074522