Title

Representation of Islam and Muslims in the Australian Media, 2001-2005

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Routledge (Taylor & Francis)

Faculty

Business and Law

School

Marketing, Tourism and Leisure

RAS ID

4290

Comments

This article was originally published as: Kabir, N. (2006). Representation of Islam and Muslims in the Australian media, 2001–2005. Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs, 26(3), 313-328. Original available here

Abstract

Muslim Australians believe that prevailing media attitudes towards them and their religion, Islam, disadvantages them both economically and socially. The Western media is alleged to have aggravated anti-Muslim sentiment since the 1990–1991 Gulf Crises, and after September 11, 2001 and the Bali tragedy in 2002, effectively divided the world into the Muslim terrorists (“evil”) and the civilised Christians (“good”). Within the framework of national interest and security, this paper examines whether Muslims' allegation of media bias is valid. If so, then, it will address the question, why is the media demonising this group of people, and who is to blame for this phenomenon—the media, its audience or the militant Islamic groups? This paper is based on primary and secondary sources including oral testimonies.

DOI

10.1080/13602000601141281

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1080/13602000601141281