Title

Phonological and syntactic processing and the role of working memory in reading comprehension among secondary school students

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

Computing, Health and Science

RAS ID

4821

Comments

This article was originally published as: Holsgrove, J. V., & Garton, A. F. (2006). Phonological and syntactic processing and the role of working memory in reading comprehension among secondary school students. Australian journal of psychology, 58(2), 111-118. Original available here

Abstract

The performance of 60 13-year-old students was examined on tasks measuring phonological processing, syntactic processing, and reading comprehension. The students were also tested on several measures of working memory relating to the phonological loop and central executive. A series of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that phonological processing and syntactic processing were both predictors of reading comprehension, and that the presence or absence of the latter distinguished good and poor readers respectively. The phonological loop, but not the central executive, was found to play a small but significant role in the processes involved in reading comprehension.

DOI

10.1080/00049530600730476

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1080/00049530600730476