Title

Acceptability of Routine Screening for Perinatal Depression

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

Psychology and Social Science

RAS ID

4909

Comments

This article was originally published as: Buist, A., Condon, J., Brooks, J. A., Speelman, C. P., Milgrom, J., Hayes, B., Ellwood, D., Barnett, B., Kowalenko, N., Matthey, S., Austin, M., & Bilszta, J. (2006). Acceptability of routine screening for perinatal depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 93(1-3), 233-237. Original article available here

Abstract

To assess the acceptability of routine screening for perinatal depression.Postnatal women (n=860) and health professionals (n=916) were surveyed after 3 years of routine perinatal (antenataland postnatal) use of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Over 90% of women had the screening explained to them and found the EPDS easy to complete; 85% had no difficulties completing it. Discomfort with screening was significantly related to having a higher EPDS score. A majority of health professionals using the EPDS was comfortable and found it useful. The sample involved only maternity services supporting depression screening. In addition, the response rate from GPs was low. Routine screening with the EPDS is acceptable to most women and health professionals. Sensitive explanation, along with staff training and support, is essential in implementing depression screening.

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1016/j.jad.2006.02.019