Title

The relationship between size-free body shape and choice of retreat for Western Australian Ctenophorus (Agamidae) dragon lizards

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Brill Academics

Faculty

Business and Public Management

School

Marketing, Tourism and Leisure

RAS ID

3213

Comments

This article was originally published as: Thompson, G. G., & Withers, P. C. (2005). The relationship between size-free body shape and choice of retreat for Western Australian Ctenophorus (Agamidae) dragon lizards. Amphibia-Reptilia, 26(1), 65-72. Original available here

Abstract

We examined the relationship between body shape and choice of retreat for males of 17 species of Western Australian Ctenophorus dragon lizards, accounting for body size by using Somers' (1986, 1989) size-free principal component analysis. Ctenophorus species group strongly in size-free morphometric space (shape) based on the nature of their natural retreat (i.e. burrows, no burrows and rocks). Those species that dig their own burrow as a retreat have short tails and hind limbs, whereas that those do not generally retreat to a burrow have longer lower hind limbs and hind feet. Three of the four species that retreat to crevices or under rocks have a dorso-ventrally flattened head and body, and relatively long upper fore-limbs. The fourth rock-retreat species (C. caudicinctus) does not have a dorso-ventrally flattened head and body; its body shape is intermediate between those species in the three ecological groups.

DOI

10.1163/1568538053693323

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1163/1568538053693323