Title

The effects of perceptual processes on the measurement of service quality

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.

Faculty

Business and Public Management

School

Marketing, Tourism and Leisure

RAS ID

2082

Comments

This article was originally published as: Palmer, A., & O’neill, M. (2003). The effects of perceptual processes on the measurement of service quality. Journal of Services Marketing, 17(3), 254-274. Original available here

Abstract

Methods of measuring service quality have suffered from a lack of discussion about perceptual processes involved in a consumer’s evaluation of quality. Most importantly, it is the perception of service quality at the time of the next purchase decision that may better explain repeat buying behaviour, rather than the traditional measure taken immediately post‐consumption. This paper reports on a study of visitors to an adventure theme park. A longitudinal study employing a modified SERVQUAL scale observed that perceptions of service quality declined with the passage of time. Perceptions of items of high importance and those involving tangible elements declined the least. Changes in individuals’ perceptions over time were found to be associated with changes in behavioural intention.

DOI

10.1108/08876040310474819

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1108/08876040310474819