Title

Knowledge management and intellectual capital: an empirical examination of current practice in Australia

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Palgrave MacMillan Ltd

Faculty

Business and Public Management

School

Business

RAS ID

2483

Comments

This article was originally published as: Zhou, A. Z., & Fink, D. (2003). Knowledge management and intellectual capital: an empirical examination of current practice in Australia. Knowledge Management Research & Practice, 1(2), 86-94. Original available here

Abstract

This paper reports the findings from a survey conducted in Australia to explore current practices relating to knowledge management (KM) and intellectual capital (IC). A systematic approach in the form of the intellectual capital web guided the research. Findings revealed that KM was perceived to be more about developing knowledge culture than about managing organisational processes and structure. IC was perceived to be more about human capital than about customer capital and organisational capital. It can therefore be concluded that human capital holds the greatest importance for KM and IC. However, when facilitators for knowledge creation and knowledge sharing were rated, organisation structure was perceived to be more important than organisational culture and information technology. For KM practices, participants indicated that more attention was paid to training and developing employees and less to measurement and reward and incentive issues. The importance of aligning the management of IC and KM was perceived to be more important than the difficulty of doing so.

DOI

10.1057/palgrave.kmrp.8500009

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1057/palgrave.kmrp.8500009