Title

Public opinion and criminal justice: Emotion, Morality and Consensus

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

Psychology

RAS ID

1947

Comments

This article was originally published as: McKillop, D., & Helmes, E. (2003). Public opinion and criminal justice: emotion, morality and consensus. Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 10(1), 210-220. Original available here

Abstract

The following article is a discussion of some of the findings of the first author's recent doctoral research on the public's reasoning about criminal justice. Psychosocial implications of the research are examined. Specifically, the discussion sounds a note of caution about assuming that the public is emotional or moralistic in its evaluations of offences or that there is a consensual body of public opinion about criminal justice. Analysis of research findings showed little evidence that the public makes punitive judgments about criminal offences on the basis of emotional or moral concerns and there was extensive variability in the data. The article provides sufficient empirical background to inform the discussion but it is not intended as a comprehensive research report.

DOI

10.1375/pplt.2003.10.1.210

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1375/pplt.2003.10.1.210