Title

Consanguineous marriage and childhood health

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

MacKeith Press

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Science

RAS ID

2332

Comments

Originally published as: Bittles, A. H. (2003). Consanguineous marriage and childhood health. Developmental Medicine and child neurology, 45(8), 571-576. Original article available here

Abstract

As previously described, the subject of consanguineous marriage became a source of major scientific and public interest in the UK and the USA from the mid-19th century onwards. Much of this interest centred on the claimed deleterious outcomes of consanguinity, although there were also scientists and clinicians who denied any adverse effects and instead argued that inbreeding offered major biological advantages. A large majority of studies have indicated that early mortality is increased in the progeny of consanguineous unions when compared with children born to unrelated parents. However, most of these studies failed to control for the potential effects of sociodemographic variables. Where such control was attempted, as in extensive post-World War II surveys conducted in Japan, the adverse biological effects of consanguinity were still present but were much less obvious, and similar findings have been reported in more recent studies in the Indian sub-continent.

DOI

10.1109/ICON.2003.1266219

 
COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1109/ICON.2003.1266219