Title

A Comparison of Temporal Speech and Text Cueing in Educational Multimedia

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Blackwell Publishers Ltd

Faculty

Community Services, Education and Social Sciences

School

Education

RAS ID

1089

Comments

This article was originally published as: Newhouse, C. P., Pagram, J. E., Campbell, A. B., Mann, B., & Schultz, H. (2002). A Comparison of Temporal Speech and Text Cueing in Educational Multimedia. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 18(3), 296-308. Original article available here

Abstract

This research focused on the prediction that children in their school setting would learn more from educational multimedia when critical information was presented as spoken instead of textual cues. Analyses of a study (n = 42) showed that 12-year-olds did not learn any more from temporal speech cueing than from temporal text cueing. The findings suggest that multimedia learning for children is a different kind of learning experience than for adults or older adolescents. The results indicate underdeveloped executive control of the referential connections in the children's working memory between reading screen text while listening to spoken cues, and between watching on-screen animations play while listening to spoken cues. Further study is warranted. Implications may be derived for educational multimedia research in school settings.

DOI

10.1046/j.0266-4909.2002.00241.x

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1046/j.0266-4909.2002.00241.x