Title

Survey timing and consumer perceptions of service quality: An overview of empirical evidence

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

MCB UP Ltd

Faculty

Business and Public Management

School

Marketing, Tourism and Leisure

RAS ID

219

Comments

Originally published as: O’Neill, M., & Palmer, A. (2001). Survey timing and consumer perceptions of service quality: an overview of empirical evidence. Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, 11(3), 182-190. Original article available here

Abstract

Reports on a program of research to learn more about the effects of survey timing on customers’ perceptions of service quality. Argues that an individual’s perceptions of service quality may not be stable over time and that suppliers should be particularly interested in consumers’ perceptions at the time that the next re‐purchase decision is made, rather than the period immediately following consumption. Reports empirical evidence on a number of studies from the hospitality, tourism and higher education sectors in Western Australia. States that results to date cast doubt on the wisdom of the traditional exit survey approach to service quality assessment. Warns that the information derived from the traditional exit survey may not necessarily bear any relation to the chances of converting one time customers into lifetime customers. It follows that the major pre‐occupation of many organisations with measuring perceptions during or immediately following service consumption may have little relevance to service quality perceptions which are important in subsequently forming future re‐purchase intentions.

DOI

10.1108/09604520110391351

 
COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1108/09604520110391351