Title

Amyloid imaging results, from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study of aging

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

Exercise, Biomedical & Health Science/Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's Disease Research and Care

RAS ID

10680

Comments

This article was originally published as: Rowe, C., Ellis, K., Rimajova, M. , Bourgeat, P., Pike, K., Jones, G., Fripp, J., Tochon-Danguy, H., Morandeau, L., O'Keefe, G., Price, R., Raniga, P., Robins, P., Acosta, O., Lenzo, N. , Szoeke, C., Salvado, O., Head, R., Martins, R. N., Masters, C., Ames, D., & Villemagne, V. (2010). Amyloid imaging results, from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study of aging. Neurobiology of Aging, 31(8), 1275-1283. NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Neurobiology of Aging. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Neurobiology of Aging, 31,8, (2010)DOI#” .

Abstract

The Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study of aging, a participant of the worldwide Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), performed 11C-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) scans in 177 healthy controls (HC), 57 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, and 53 mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. High PiB binding was present in 33% of HC (49% in ApoE- 4 carriers vs 21% in noncarriers) and increased with age, most strongly in 4 carriers. 18% of HC aged 60-69 had high PiB binding rising to 65% in those over 80 years. Subjective memory complaint was only associated with elevated PiB binding in 4 carriers. There was no correlation with cognition in HC or MCI. PiB binding in AD was unrelated to age, hippocampal volume or memory. Beta-amyloid (A ) deposition seems almost inevitable with advanced age, amyloid burden is similar at all ages in AD, and secondary factors or downstream events appear to play a more direct role than total beta amyloid burden in hippocampal atrophy and cognitive decline.

DOI

10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2010.04.007

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2010.04.007