Title

Going Overboard? Representing Hazara Afghan Refugees as Just Like Us

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Routledge

Faculty

Education and Arts

School

Communications and Arts, Centre for Research in Entertainment, Arts,Technology, Education and Communications

RAS ID

5773

Comments

This article was originally published as: Rodan, D., & Lange, C. (2008). Going overboard? Representing Hazara Afghan refugees as just like us. Journal of Intercultural Studies, 29(2), 153-169. Original available here

Abstract

In this paper we analyse two Australian television programs, Marking Time (2003) and Molly & Mobarak (2004), foregrounding the ways in which ethnic Hazara refugees from Afghanistan have been (re)presented. We argue that by minimising cultural and religious differences both Marking Time and Molly & Mobarak construct and represent Hazara Afghan refugees as like a “certain us”, that is, as members of Australian core culture who are predominately white, family oriented and inclusivist. However, their differences are not concealed entirely and in both programs the Hazara also appear as the “other”, that is, unlike us. We point out some problems associated with privileging similarity and the possible consequences of these representations within policy making and Australian society more generally.

DOI

10.1080/07256860801938625

Access Rights

open access

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1080/07256860801938625