Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Faculty

Faculty of Education and Arts

School

School of Communication and Arts / Centre for Research in Entertainment, Arts,Technology, Education and Communications

RAS ID

12540

Comments

This article was originally published as: Original article available here

This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Notes and Queries following peer review. The version of record Durey, J. F. (2011). A stabbing in Chawton, Jane Austen, and Emma. Notes and Queries, 58(1), 80-82. is available online: here

Abstract

The article discusses a stabbing that is mentioned in a letter by the novelist Jane Austen. The event took place in Chawton, England in March 1814 and involved Stephen Mersh (b. 1796), who was allegedly stabbed by James Baigen, who was later acquitted of the crime. Details about Mersh's life are presented. Information is also included about Sir Thomas Miller, who represented Chawton in Parliament from 1806-1816 and the Honorouble William Wickham, who was an acquaintance of Austen's brother. Baigen, it is noted, committed suicide in 1851 after the death of his father forced the family to move away from the farm they had inhabited for generations. An episode in Austen's novel "Emma" is described.

DOI

10.1093/notesj/gjq212

Access Rights

free_to_read

 
COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1093/notesj/gjq212