Title

Training Agility and Change-of-direction Speed (CODS)

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Editor(s)

Marco Cardinale, Robert Newton, Kazunori Nosaka

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Exercise and Health Sciences

RAS ID

13421

Comments

This chapter was originally published as: Sheppard, J. M., & Young, W. (2011). Training agility and change-of-direction speed (CODS). In Marco Cardinale, Robert Newton, Kazunori Nosaka (Eds.). Strength and Conditioning: Biological Principles and Practical Applications (pp. 363-376). Wiley-Blackwell.

Abstract

An agility task may be hest described as a rapid, whole-body change of direction or speed in response to a stimulus (Sheppard and Young, 2006). Many other approaches to defining agility have focused on the physical requirement only, generally a whole-body direction change (Fulton, 1992; Rigg and Reilly, 1987; Tsitskarsis, Theoharopoulus and Garefis, 2003). The unique distinction between the definition used by Sheppard and Young (2006) and other previous definitions is the inclusion of reaction to a stimulus, rather than just change-of-direction speed (COOS). Put simply, agility is an open skill, and COOS is a closed skill. Closed skills can be precisely pre-planned, whilst open skills involve movements that are composed in response to circumstances in the environment (stimuli), such as the movement of a competitor or the bounce of a ball.

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