Title

Bystanders matter: Associations between reinforcing, defending, and the frequency of bullying behavior in classrooms

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Routledge

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Exercise and Health Sciences

RAS ID

12325

Comments

This article was originally published as: Salmivalli, C. , Voeten, M., & Poskiparta, E. (2011). Bystanders matter: Associations between reinforcing, defending, and the frequency of bullying behavior in classrooms. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 40(5), 668-676. Original article available here

Abstract

This study investigated whether the bystanders’ behaviors (reinforcing the bully vs. defending the victim) in bullying situations are related to the frequency of bullying in a classroom. The sample consisted of 6,764 primary school children from Grades 3 to 5 (9–11 years of age), who were nested within 385 classrooms in 77 schools. The students filled out Internet-based questionnaires in their schools’ computer labs. The results from multilevel models showed that defending the victim was negatively associated with the frequency of bullying in a classroom, whereas the effect of reinforcing the bully was positive and strong. The results suggest that bystander responses influence the frequency of bullying, which makes them suitable targets for antibullying interventions.

DOI

10.1080/15374416.2011.597090

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1080/15374416.2011.597090