Title

Differences of hyphal and soil phosphatase activities in drought-stressed mycorrhizal trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Natural Sciences

RAS ID

12338

Comments

This article was originally published as: Wu, Q., Zou, Y., & He, X. (2011). Differences of hyphal and soil phosphatase activities in drought-stressed mycorrhizal trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings. Scientia Horticulturae, 129(2), 294-298. Original article available here

Abstract

Differences of hyphal and soil phosphatase activities between mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants were less studied under drought-stressed (DS) conditions. In a pot experiment, fungal alkaline phosphatase (FALP), and succinate dehydrogenase (FSDH), soil phosphatase activity, both soil and plant P contents were compared in 6.5-month-old trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings under 80 days of DS with or without inoculations by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomus diaphanum, Glomus mosseae or Glomus versiforme). Plant growth and biomass production under DS were significantly higher in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal seedlings. Both the FALP and the FSDH activities under DS were significantly reduced in these three Glomus inoculated seedlings. In general, similar soil neutral and alkaline phosphatase activities, but significantly higher soil acid and total phosphatase activities, were exhibited in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal seedlings under both the well-watered (WW) and the DS. Both leaf and root P contents were significantly higher in the AM colonized seedlings, but soil available P contents were lower in the growth media with AM seedlings. Our results showed that higher hyphal enzymes’ activities, soil acid and total phosphatase activities, and plant P contents in AM colonized seedlings, particularly in Glomus mosseae-colonized seedlings and/or under DS, would result in a better growth of the host plants, which might be the basis for enhancing drought tolerance in plants

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1016/j.scienta.2011.03.051