Title

Importance of topography and topsoil selection and storage in successfully rehabilitating post-closure sand mines featuring pit lakes.

Document Type

Journal Article

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Natural Sciences / Centre for Ecosystem Management

RAS ID

14506

Comments

This article was originally published as: Van Etten, E. J., Mccullough, C. D., & Lund, M. A. (2012). Importance of topography and topsoil selection and storage in successfully rehabilitating post-closure sand mines featuring pit lakes. Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy Section A: Mining Technology, 121(3), 139-150. Original article available here

Abstract

Rehabilitation at a silica sand mine on the Swan Coastal Plain of Western Australia, where the post-mine landscape consists of small pit lakes (dredge ponds) with surrounding battered slopes, and where a range of ecological restoration techniques have been applied, was monitored for several years to gauge success or otherwise of these techniques. Results clearly showed the benefits of using fresh topsoil for restoration over topsoil that has been stockpiled for several years. Most topsoil used in restoration was from seasonal wetlands and consequently restoration was most successful in the riparian zone from the edge of pit lakes to ∼2 m vertically above the water table. Rehabilitated areas above this level remained poor in plant species and cover with remedial actions largely unsuccessful. We believe that matching topsoil to site and development of topographic profiles similar to natural wetlands of the region are the keys to optimising rehabilitation success around pit lakes formed by sand mining in areas with shallow groundwater.

DOI

10.1179/1743286312Y.0000000017

Access Rights

Not open access

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