Title

An investigation into the capacity of student motivation and emotion regulation strategies to predict engagement and resilience in the middle school classroom

Document Type

Journal Article

Faculty

Faculty of Education and Arts

School

School of Education / Fogarty Learning Centre

RAS ID

14399

Comments

This article was originally published as: Fried, L. J., & Chapman, E. (2012). An investigation into the capacity of student motivation and emotion regulation strategies to predict engagement and resilience in the middle school classroom . Australian Educational Researcher, 39(3), 295-311. Original article available here

Abstract

Although most of the initial research on self-regulated learning focused on cognitive and meta-cognitive aspects, there has been a growing interest in the emotion and motivation domains of self-regulation. This article reports on research undertaken to investigate specific motivation and emotion regulation strategies used by middle school students and the relationship between the use of such strategies and student engagement and resilience. The research targeted one type of motivation regulation—goal-oriented strategies—and two types of emotion regulation: antecedent and stress release strategies, together with avoidance strategies. Students who used goal-oriented motivation regulation strategies were more likely than others to be resilient. Contrasting results were obtained when investigating the ability of each emotion regulation strategy type to predict engagement and resilience. As expected, students who used avoidant strategies were less likely than others to develop resilience. This article discusses the implications of the research for the classroom, including the teaching of particular motivation and emotion regulation strategies to students and providing the right classroom environment for strategy development.

Access Rights

Not open access

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