Title

The Efficacy of Simulation as a Pedagogy in Facilitating Pre-Service Teachers’ Learning About Emotional Self-Regulation and its Relevance to the Teaching Profession

Document Type

Journal Article

Faculty

Faculty of Education and Arts

School

School of Education / Edith Cowan Institute for Education Research

RAS ID

14572

Comments

This article was originally published as: De Jong, T. A., Lane, J. M., & Sharp, S. (2012). The Efficacy of Simulation as a Pedagogy in Facilitating Pre-Service Teachers’ Learning About Emotional Self-Regulation and its Relevance to the Teaching Profession. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 37(3), 34-43. Original article available here

Abstract

This study was undertaken in response to the imperative of teacher education courses incorporating National Professional Standards for Teachers, in particular Standard 7, which deals with the professional engagement of teachers (AITSL, 2011). It aimed to evaluate the efficacy of simulation and active recall as a learner-centred pedagogy in facilitating pre-service teachers’ learning about their capacity to self-regulate emotionally and its relevance to the profession. A simulated ‘critical incident’ was used in a lecture to guide students (n=106) to analyse and understand their emotional responses to an altercation between the lecturer and a colleague. The evaluation involved both quantitative and qualitative data collection. The study generated six useful insights associated with the efficacy of simulation pedagogy and revealed convincingly that this pedagogy can engage students actively in learning about the importance of emotional self-regulation in relation to their professional role as a teacher.

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