Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

CCH Australia Limited

Faculty

Faculty of Business and Law

School

School of Management / Centre for Innovative Practice

RAS ID

14105

Comments

This article was originally published as: Bahn, S. T. (2012). Construction Induction Training: Does mandatory training work?. Journal of Health, Safety and Environment, 28(3), 17. Original article available here

Abstract

Reducing the high level of deaths and injuries in the construction industry is a continual challenge. It is a specific challenge in Western Australia (WA), where the industry is adapting to the additional pressures of a resources-led development boom. In 2006, Worksafe WA responded by introducing mandatory certification in basic safety training for all employees, before they could set foot on a work site. This paper reviews the impact of this training initiative on the commercial sector of the construction industry, the training organisations, and the construction employees. The mixed methodology study collects both the perceptions of the stakeholders and analyses the incident statistics. The findings indicate that this initiative has made a difference, with almost all respondents reporting that they believe their workplaces are safer having completed the training. Mandatory training has contributed to perceptions of improved safety culture within the commercial sector of the construction industry in WA. The intention is to expand this study to explore the variations of the impact of the scheme on the remaining sectors of the construction industry in WA and then nationally to determine what developments could be made to increase future effectiveness across the industry, and the nation.

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not open access

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