Title

Beyond mutual acculturation. Intergroup relations among immigrants, Anglo-Australians, and Indigenous Australians

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Hogrefe Publishing

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Psychology and Social Science/Social Justice Research Centre

RAS ID

16151

Comments

This article was originally published as: Dandy, J. K., & Pe-Pua, R. (2013). Beyond mutual acculturation. Intergroup relations among immigrants, Anglo-Australians, and Indigenous Australians. Zeitschrift fuer Psychologie (Journal of Psychology), 221(4), 232-241. Original article available here

Abstract

In this paper we examine intercultural relations from a three-way perspective (among immigrants/refugees, Anglo-Australians, and Indigenous Australians) through the lens of social cohesion and its dimensions (belonging, inclusion, participation, recognition, and legitimacy). Our data are drawn from three community case studies involving 15 focus group discussions (138 community residents) and 54 key informant interviews (government and nongovernment service providers and community representatives). Our findings highlight the complexity of intergroup relations, with tensions driven largely by realistic threat concerns and perceived relative deprivation among Anglo-Australians and Indigenous Australians. These concerns intersected with intercultural recognition and national identity. Finally, there was a general lack of the kind of intergroup contact that would decrease prejudice. The findings are discussed in relation to acculturation research and the complexity of intergroup relations in plural societies.

DOI

10.1027/2151-2604/a000153

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