Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Common Ground

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Psychology and Social Science

RAS ID

16194

Comments

This article was originally published as: Guilfoyle, A.M. (2013). Racism, pedagogy, and 'cultural competency' of psychology students working with Aboriginal communities. International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum, 19(3), 255-268. Original article available here

Abstract

This paper reflects on qualitative research methods as an epistemological safe space for teaching praxis and strategies for psychology students’ learning experiences about cultural issues and processes for working with marginalised cultural communities. A general argument for the inequities facing Australian Indigenous communities is suggested, alongside how a qualitative research methods curriculum of psychology might be one strategy to support social change. Drawing on a third year research methods unit, several case study examples of teaching praxis and strategies for including cultural content within qualitative research methodologies is provided. Evidence on the utility of such examples for learning experiences about cultural issues and processes for working with marginalised cultural communities is discussed. The paper concludes teaching qualitative research methodologies not only has capacity for differentiating and personalising instruction in a way that brings cultural issues to life for students, but do so in a culturally secure way.

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