Title

Toward Understanding the Street Code of Silence that Exists among Prolific Graffiti Offenders

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Taylor & Francis Inc.

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Psychology and Social Science/Lifespan Resilience Research Group

RAS ID

17133

Comments

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Victims & Offenders on 17 March 2013 as: Taylor, M. F. (2013). Toward understanding the street code of silence that exists among prolific graffiti offenders. Victims & Offenders: An International Journal of Evidence-based Research, Policy and Practice, 8(2), 185-208. Available online here

Abstract

Graffiti crews vary in size from small (2-5 members) to very large (50-100+ members). This study uses a mixed-method research design (i.e., descriptive statistics, grounded theory, and ethnography) to explore 21 small-crew members' adherence to the graffiti subculture's "no snitch" maxim. The study's findings are encapsulated in its core theory: Members of small graffiti crews bond together under the graffiti subculture's "no snitch" maxim, as adherence to this code of silence provides them with the protective/emotional support resources that are otherwise deficient in their everyday lives. The implications of their adherence to the street code of silence are discussed.

DOI

10.1080/15564886.2012.763196

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