Title

Pilot randomised controlled trial of a radiation therapist-led educational intervention for breast cancer patients prior to commencing radiotherapy

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Springer Verlag

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Exercise and Health Sciences/Child Health Promotion Research Centre

RAS ID

15827

Comments

This article was originally published as: Halkett, G., O'Connor, M., Aranda, S., Jefford, M., Shaw, T. M., York , D., Spry, N., Taylor, M., & Schofield, P. (2013). Pilot randomised controlled trial of a radiation therapist-led educational intervention for breast cancer patients prior to commencing radiotherapy. Support Care in Cancer, 21(6), 1725-1733. Original article available here

Abstract

Purpose: Although patients receive information prior to commencing radiotherapy, they often experience anxiety and distress. We conducted a pilot randomised controlled trial to determine whether a radiation therapist led psycho-educational intervention for breast cancer patients prior to radiotherapy is likely to be effective in reducing radiotherapy-related concerns, patient anxiety and depression. Methods: The intervention comprised two face-to-face consultations with a radiation therapist (one prior to radiation planning and the other prior to treatment). Patients completed surveys at baseline, prior to treatment planning and on the first day of treatment. Outcome measures included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Radiation Therapy Related Patient Concerns and Radiation Therapy Knowledge Scales. Results: One hundred and twenty two patients completed baseline measures. Fifty-eight patients received usual care, and 64 received the intervention. After the first consultation, patient anxiety was significantly lower in the intervention group (p = 0.048), as were concerns about radiotherapy (p = 0.001). There were no differences between groups for depression. Patient knowledge for the intervention group was higher after the first consultation (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This intervention is likely to be effective in reducing patient anxiety and concerns and increasing knowledge. Future research is required to test this intervention with a larger population.

DOI

10.1007/s00520-013-1719-5

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