Title

Investigative Journalism on Campus

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Routledge

Faculty

Faculty of Education and Arts

School

School of Communication and Arts/Centre for Research in Entertainment, Arts, Technology, Education and Communications

RAS ID

16523

Comments

This article was originally published as : Richards, I., & Josephi, B. U. (2013). Investigative Journalism on Campus. Journalism Practice, 7(2), 199-211. Original article available here

Abstract

Despite many obstacles, investigative journalism continues to flourish in Australia. A significant part of the explanation for this appears to lie with universities which have journalism programs. Investigative journalism has a strong presence in these programs across Australia, a presence which is increasingly being felt at postgraduate level. As a result, an increasing number of journalism graduates have the skills and understanding necessary to embark on serious investigative work, and several institutions have embarked on projects with innovative approaches to collaborative investigative work. However, the wider context in which Australia's tertiary institutions operate is far from benign, and journalism programs—and thus the teaching of investigative journalism—are subject to many pressures. The paper finds that, although university journalism programs are increasingly taking responsibility for educating their students about investigative journalism, thereby picking up a key responsibility which would once have been borne entirely by the industry, there are also forces at work which limit their capacity to do this.

DOI

10.1080/17512786.2012.753289

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