Title

Effects of branched-chain amino acids supplementation on both plasma amino acids concentration and muscle energetics changes resulting from muscle damage: A randomized placebo controlled trial

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier

Place of Publication

Netherlands

School

Centre for Exercise and Sport Science Research / School of Exercise and Health Sciences

RAS ID

20642

Comments

Originally published as: Fouré, A., Nosaka, K., Gastaldi, M., Mattei, J.-P., Boudinet, H., Guye, M. ... Gondin, J. (2015). Effects of branched-chain amino acids supplementation on both plasma amino acids concentration and muscle energetics changes resulting from muscle damage: A randomized placebo controlled trial in Clinical Nutrition, 35(1), 83-94. Available here.

Abstract

Background & aims: Branched-chain amino acids promote muscle-protein synthesis, reduce protein oxidation and have positive effects on mitochondrial biogenesis and reactive oxygen species scavenging. The purpose of the study was to determine the potential benefits of branched-chain amino acids supplementation on changes in force capacities, plasma amino acids concentration and muscle metabolic alterations after exercise-induced muscle damage. Methods: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical analyses were used to follow the changes after such damage. Twenty six young healthy men were randomly assigned to supplemented branched-chain amino acids or placebo group. Knee extensors maximal voluntary isometric force was assessed before and on four days following exercise-induced muscle damage. Concentrations in phosphocreatine [PCr], inorganic phosphate [Pi] and pH were measured during a standardized rest-exercise-recovery protocol before, two (D2) and four (D4) days after exercise-induced muscle damage. Results: No significant difference between groups was found for changes in maximal voluntary isometric force (−24% at D2 and −21% at D4). Plasma alanine concentration significantly increased immediately after exercise-induced muscle damage (+25%) in both groups while concentrations in glycine, histidine, phenylalanine and tyrosine decreased. No difference between groups was found in the increased resting [Pi] (+42% at D2 and +34% at D4), decreased resting pH (−0.04 at D2 and −0.03 at D4) and the slower PCr recovery rate (−18% at D2 and −24% at D4). Conclusions: The damaged muscle was not able to get benefits out of the increased plasma branched-chain amino acids availability to attenuate changes in indirect markers of muscle damage

DOI

10.1016/j.clnu.2015.03.014

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