Title

Do law students stand apart from other university students in their quest for mental health: A comparative study on wellbeing and associated behaviours in law and psychology students

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier Ltd

School

School of Psychology

RAS ID

20134

Comments

Originally published as: Skead, N.K., Rogers, S.L. (2015). Do law students stand apart from other university students in their quest for mental health: A comparative study on wellbeing and associated behaviours in law and psychology students. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 42-43, 81-90. Original article available here.

Abstract

We are not producing a product, but a well-balanced person.1 It is well-documented that law students experience higher levels of psychological distress than members of the general population and university students in other professional disciplines. In 2014, we published our findings on an empirical study identifying the correlations between law student wellbeing and student behaviour both at and away from law school. The results of the study informed the development of an evidence-based ‘behavioural toolkit’ to assist law students and law schools in making informed choices and decisions that promote and even improve the mental health of students. The study we undertook was not, however, limited to law students. It extended to collecting quantitative data on psychological distress and associated behaviours in psychology students. This article reports on the comparative findings of the study and provides a comparative basis for understanding the contextual influences on the wellbeing of law students.

DOI

10.1016/j.ijlp.2015.08.011

Access Rights

Open access