Title

Predicting playing status in junior Australian Football using physical and anthropometric parameters

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Exercise and Health Sciences

RAS ID

18965

Comments

This article was originally published as: Woods C.T.E., Raynor A.J., Bruce L., McDonald Z., Collier N. (2014). Predicting playing status in junior Australian Football using physical and anthropometric parameters. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 18(2), 225-229. Original article available here

Abstract

Objectives: To use physical and anthropometric parameters to predict playing status in junior Australian Football. Design: Cross-sectional observational. Methods: Participants were recruited from the under 18 competition within the West Australian Football League and classified into two groups; elite (state representative; n = 50; 17.9 ± 0.5 y; 184.8 ± 6.9 cm; 80.6 ± 9.4 kg) and sub-elite (non-state representative; n = 50; 17.8 ± 0.6 y; 179.8 ± 5.4 cm; 74.4 ± 7.9 kg). Both groups completed physical/anthropometric tests inclusive of a 5 m, 10 m and 20 m sprint, an agility test, stationary vertical jump, dynamic dominant and non-dominant foot vertical jump, 20 m multistage fitness test, standing height and body mass. A multivariate analysis of variance was used to test the main effect of 'status' on the physical/anthropometric parameters, whilst logistic regression models were used to predict playing status using the physical/anthropometric parameters. Results: On average, the elite group were taller, heavier, had a greater stationary vertical jump, dynamic dominant and non-dominant foot vertical jump and higher maximal aerobic capacity as measured by the multistage fitness test (p < 0.05). The combination of standing height, dynamic vertical jump non-dominant foot and the 20 m multistage fitness test were the strongest predictors of status (Akaike's Information Criterion = 96.35). Conclusions: Despite mean differences in a number of parameters, the combination of standing height, dynamic vertical jump non-dominant foot and the multistage fitness test were the strongest predictors of status and thus important tests for initially identifying potential talent in junior Australian Football. Crown

DOI

10.1016/j.jsams.2014.02.006

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