Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Frontiers Research Foundation

Place of Publication

Switzerland

Faculty

Faculty of Education and Arts

School

School of Arts and Humanities

RAS ID

20290

Comments

Originally publishes as: Campitelli, G. (2015). Answering research questions without calculating the mean. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(2015), 1379. Original article available here

Abstract

In an important theoretical article Speelman and McGann (2013) indicated that psychological researchers tend to use statistical procedures that involve calculating the mean of a variable in an uncritical manner. A typical procedure in psychological research consists of calculating the mean of some dependent variable in two or more samples and to present those means as summaries of the samples. The next step is to use some statistical technique (e.g., t -test, ANOVA) in order to be able to determine the probability of finding the observed differences between means in those samples given that the difference between the means of the populations from which the samples were extracted is zero. If this probability is very low (i.e., < 0.05) the psychological researcher decides that the difference between the means of the populations of interest is not zero.

DOI

10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01379

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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