Title

Interviewing witnesses in Australia

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publisher

Routledge

Place of Publication

Oxon

Editor(s)

David Walsh, Gavin E. Oxburgh, Alison D. Redlich, Trond Myklebust

Faculty

Faculty of Education and Arts

School

School of Arts and Humanities

RAS ID

20424

Comments

Originally published as: Tudor-Owen, J., & Scott, A. J. (2016). Interviewing witnesses in Australia. In Walsh, D., Oxburgh, G. E., Redlich, A. D., & Myklebust, T. (Eds.). International developments and practices in investigative interviewing and interrogation (73-86). Oxon: Routledge. Available here.

Abstract

Much has been written internationally since the early 1990s concerning the development, implementation and evaluation of investigative interviewing models. In Australia, however, what is known as investigative interviewing was not adopted in most jurisdictions until a decade later and in some jurisdictions almost 20 years later. While investigative interviewing in the context of interviews with adults was imported to Australia from England and Wales, the various Australian jurisdictions have adapted the approach to suit local needs. The impetus for the development of investigative interviewing in England an Wales has been attributed at least in part, to a number of widely publicised miscarriages of justice. In Australia, by comparison, the motivation to introduce investigative interviewing models has largely been attributed to individual jurisdiction observing improvements in practice internationally and pursuing change locally as a result.