Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

BioMed Central Ltd.

Place of Publication

United Kingdom

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

24324

Comments

Originally published as: Searles, A., Doran, C., Attia, J., Knight, D., Wiggers, J., Deeming, S., . . . Nilsson, M. (2016). An approach to measuring and encouraging research translation and research impact. Health Research Policy and Systems, 14(1), 60. doi:10.1186/s12961-016-0131-2. Original article available here

Abstract

Background: Research translation, particularly in the biomedical area, is often discussed but there are few methods that are routinely used to measure it or its impact. Of the impact measurement methods that are used, most aim to provide accountability - to measure and explain what was generated as a consequence of funding research. This case study reports on the development of a novel, conceptual framework that goes beyond measurement. The Framework To Assess the Impact from Translational health research, or FAIT, is a platform designed to prospectively measure and encourage research translation and research impact. A key assumption underpinning FAIT is that research translation is a prerequisite for research impact. Methods: The research impact literature was mined to understand the range of existing frameworks and techniques employed to measure and encourage research translation and research impact. This review provided insights for the development of a FAIT prototype. A Steering Committee oversaw the project and provided the feedback that was used to refine FAIT. Results: The outcome of the case study was the conceptual framework, FAIT, which is based on a modified program logic model and a hybrid of three proven methodologies for measuring research impact, namely a modified Payback method, social return on investment, and case studies or narratives of the process by which research translates and generates impact. Conclusion: As funders increasingly seek to understand the return on their research investments, the routine measurement of research translation and research impact is likely to become mandatory rather than optional. Measurement of research impact on its own is insufficient. There should also be a mechanism attached to measurement that encourages research translation and impact - FAIT was designed for this task

DOI

10.1186/s12961-016-0131-2

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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