Title

Research priorities for the northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus) in the Pilbara region of Western Australia

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

CSIRO Publishing

Place of Publication

Australia

School

School of Science

RAS ID

21806

Comments

Originally published as: Cramer, V. A., Dunlop, J., Davis, R., Barnett, B., Cook, A., ... Van Leeuwen, S. (2016). Research priorities for the northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus) in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Australian Mammalogy, 38(2), 135-148. Available here

Abstract

Developing an organic luminescent solar concentrator (LSC), featuring ultralong lifetime and high transparency simultaneously, is crucial for building-integrated photovoltaic applications, such as solar energy harvesting clear windows. In this paper, a tandem organic LSC is encapsulated and connected with three optically transparent layers, namely an encapsulating epoxy layer and two insulating SiO2 layers that prevent dissolving the organic dyes into the epoxy layer. Experimental results demonstrate that the encapsulated organic LSC maintains the high average transmission of 60% in the visible range of 390-750 nm, and has an ultralong lifetime of ∼ 6.7 × 104 h under illuminated test in laboratory environment, which is around five times longer than that of the organic LSC without any encapsulation. In addition, experiments confirm that most of the photoluminescence radiation generated in the organic dyes is trapped in the high-index SiO2/epoxy/SiO2 structure, and guided between the glass substrate before emerging from the four edges of the organic LSC sample for conversion to electricity. A 30% increase in short-circuit current is attained, in comparison with a similar unencapsulated organic LSC structure

DOI

10.1071/AM15005

Access Rights

Not open access

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